breast cancer, mammograms, mother, daughter, over 40, 40

Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer: There is Hope

It all started with a lump. 

While performing a routine self breast exam, Heather Bagley’s mother experienced what every woman dreads. Finding a lump can terrify a woman for obvious reasons. Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer for women. Prospects of surgery, radically altered body image, and changes in personal relationships can all be daunting. In part because of those fears, too many women don’t perform self exams or get regular mammograms after age 40.

Unfortunately, according to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, one in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer. Health care specialists at Teton Radiology and Madison Memorial Hospital wish women would realize the magnitude of that mistake because it has a direct impact on survival rates. 

Cancer survival rates are frequently measured in increments of five years. For example, an 80 percent 5-year survival rate would mean that five years after diagnosis, 80 out of 100 patients are still living.  According to the American Cancer Society, breast cancer, when detected in its early stages, has over a 90 percent survival rate.

The high survival rates are hopeful, but that doesn’t make being diagnosed any simpler. And when a woman has breast cancer, everyone connected to her feels the jolt. 

“I remember being stunned. We all were. I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, am I going to lose my mom?’” Heather recalls.  “I’m not even sure how routinely she had done self-examinations.” Heather’s mother was diagnosed with stage IV breast cancer and has been courageously battling ever since. 

Nearly three million American woman are breast cancer survivors, and the survival rates have been climbing since the 1990s.  Awareness and early detection are a critical part of that progress. Madison Memorial wants to contribute to that trend. Having recently partnered with Huntsman Cancer Institute, MMH is now positioned to provide women with excellent care and advanced resources.  

Karl Raschke

Organizational Communication and Advocacy Major at BYU-Idaho

 

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postpartum, postpartum depression, post partum, post partum depression, mother, child

Postpartum Depression: Not a Character Flaw

Postpartum Depression

When one considers the happiness and excitement of the birth of a child, there usually aren’t expectations of doubt and sadness along with these positive emotions. However, that is what Sally felt.

According to Sally, “When I recapped all the times I could recall myself crying, it was quite often. I would just have, I guess, emotional breakdowns for no apparent reason.”

Postpartum depression (PPD) is depression which arises after birth and affects approximately one in nine women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While it is a prevalent issue, PPD is treatable with medication, counseling and/or other effective treatments prescribed by a health care provider.

A critical issue with PPD, however, is that it is often left untreated. This may be due to the mother believing her negative feelings will abate over time or due to improper interpersonal communication where support is not given.

If PPD is left untreated, it can last for months or even years. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, along with a woman’s physical health, it may hinder the mother from connecting and caring for her baby, which could lead to a host of health issues for the infant.

According to Sally, “If I wouldn’t have spoken out about what I was feeling, I probably wouldn’t know that I had a problem or that I had something that I could get support for.”

The start of medical support can begin at the Madison Community Wellness Fair at Madison Junior High School. It will be on Friday, May 12, from 2 PM to 8 PM, and will offer many free screenings on health issues like depression. Like Sally’s story shows, treatment starts by knowing where to ask for it.

(Name has been changed for confidentiality).

Karl Raschke

Organizational Communication and Advocacy Major at BYU-Idaho

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Karl’s Screening Experience

Why Screening?

I was preparing for my wedding four years ago, I began to experience mild numbness and tingling in my hands. The sensation wouldn’t dissipate, and coworkers’ opinions and stories about conditions such as diabetes and heart disease weren’t helping. The longer the numbness lasted, the greater my anxiety grew. Was something seriously wrong? Would the happy future I was envisioning as my wedding date drew closer be compromised by a health condition of which I was unaware?

Had I not been experiencing intense uncertainty, I probably wouldn’t have cared that my office was offering biometric screenings for all employees. But health was on my mind, and my worries drove me to set an appointment. The screening was surprisingly short and simple.  It was painless. Taken together, the questions and general procedures I completed lasted no more than 15 minutes. The results, however, brought lasting peace of mind.

Screenings are about timing. Sadly, too many Americans recognize the value of screenings only after being diagnosed with a late-stage illness. Up to half of all premature or early deaths in the United States are due to preventable factors, according to a report by the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. Prevention often depends on early detection, and early detection often depends on screenings.

My own experience with screenings has increased my awareness of their importance and my gratitude for the local health care establishments that promote them. At the Madison Community Wellness Fair, health care professionals will be available to provide information about screenings to men, women, and children at all stages of life. It took me fifteen minutes to ease months of worry—but that same fifteen minutes just as easily could have saved my life.

Click going below, and invite your friends!

Karl Raschke

Organizational Communication and Advocacy Major at BYU-Idaho

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Please be aware of changes in the Blue Cross insurance plans available on the Idaho Health Insurance Exchange

To our valued patients,

The following message is intended for those of you that purchase insurance on Idaho’s health insurance exchange (www.yourhealthidaho.org), especially those of you who subscribe to Blue Cross Qualified Health Plans (insurance on the exchange and individual plans).  This message does not pertain to those of you who participate through your employer’s Blue Cross group plan or Blue Cross managed Medicare.  Open enrollment on the health insurance exchange ends on January 31, 2017.  At this point, we are not sure if there is going to be a repeal or if a repeal and replace is waiting in the wings.  Either way, we want to share some things we have learned regarding health insurance sold on the exchange that affects our communities:

  • If you were enrolled on the exchange in 2016, you may have been automatically renewed under the same insurance plan you had last year.  If you are happy with that plan, carry on.  If not, please contact your insurance broker to review alternatives available to you.  Even though you automatically renewed, you still have until 1/31 to select your plan.

 

  • If you subscribe to a Blue Cross Qualified Health Plan, and you live in Bonneville or Jefferson Counties, you are automatically part of the Mountain View insurance network.  If your Primary Care Provider practices in Madison County, you have two options: find a new Primary Care Provider practicing in Bonneville or Jefferson Counties who participates in the Mountain View insurance network, or select a different insurance product sold on the health insurance exchange that has your provider in network.  If you stay with Blue Cross insurance sold on the exchange, you can be referred to Primary Care and Specialty (e.g. surgeons) Providers practicing in Madison County that are members of the Mountain View insurance network.  However, that referral must be approved by Blue Cross.  If you see a provider that is not in-network based on the county where you live, you may/will be subject to the Blue Cross out-of-network deductible of $50,000.

 

  • Madison Memorial Hospital is a “back-fill” hospital for the Mountain View insurance network.  This means you can have all the services offered by Madison Memorial Hospital, and not be subject to the $50,000 Blue Cross out-of-network deductible even if you live in Bonneville or Jefferson Counties.

 

  • If you subscribe to a Blue Cross Qualified Health Plan, and you live in Madison County, you are automatically part of the Hometown East insurance network.  If your Primary Care Physician practices in Bonneville or Jefferson Counties, you have two options: find a new Primary Care provider practicing in Madison County who participates in the Hometown East  insurance network,  or select a different insurance product sold on the health insurance exchange that has your provider in network.  If you stay with Blue Cross insurance sold on the exchange, you can be referred to Primary Care and Specialty (e.g. surgeons) providers practicing in Bonneville or Jefferson Counties.  However, that referral must be approved by Blue Cross.  If you see a provider that is not in-network based on the county where you live, you may/will be subject to the Blue Cross out-of-network deductible of $50,000.

 

  • Madison Memorial Hospital is in-network for the Hometown East insurance network.  This means you can have all the services offered by Madison Memorial Hospital, and not be subject to the $50,000 Blue Cross out-of-network deductible.

 

This is what we know for now, and we hope this information will be of assistance to you as the open enrollment period on Idaho’s health insurance exchange comes to a close for 2017.

 

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LuAnn Dixon Receives Credential

LUANN DIXON EARNS CERTIFIED INFECTION CONTROL CREDENTIAL
Milwaukee, WI [Date] – CBIC has announced that LuAnn Dixon, Infection Control Prevention of Madison Memorial Hospital has earned the Certified in Infection Control (CIC®) credential and has demonstrated a mastery of infection prevention and control knowledge by taking and passing this comprehensive examination. Certification is maintained through successful completion of a re-certification examination every five years.
The Certification Board of Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. CBIC®) administers the exam certifying individuals as Certified in Infection Control (CIC”). The purpose of the certification process is to protect the public by providing standardized measurement of current basic knowledge needed for persons practicing infection control; encouraging individual growth and study, thereby promoting professionalism among infection prevention and control professionals; and formally recognizing infection prevention and control professionals who fulfill the requirements for certification. Individuals who earn their CIC® credential join approximately 5,000 practitioners worldwide who are Certified in Infection Control. The National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA) accredits CBIC’s certification program, which signifies that CBIC has met the highest national voluntary standards for private certification. CBIC periodically conducts job analyses to assure that certification measures current practices and knowledge required for infection prevention and control and applied epidemiology.
The Certification Board of Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. (CBIC) is a voluntary autonomous multidisciplinary board that provides direction for and administers the certification process for professionals in infection prevention and control and applied epidemiology. CBIC is independent and separate from any other infection control – related organization or association. For more information about CBIC, visit www.cbic.org.

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